Important Information About IVC Filter Lawsuits

An IVC filter, also known as a blood clot filter, is a small wire implant designed to catch blood clots and prevent them from traveling to the heart and lungs. They are used in patients who cannot take anticoagulants (blood thinners) and are at risk for pulmonary embolisms.

 Purpose of an IVC Filter

The inferior vena cava (IVC) is a major vein that carries blood from the lower body into the heart. An IVC filter is a spider-like wire inserted into this vein in patients who are at high risk of a pulmonary embolism (a blockage in one of the arteries in the lungs). You can look for Bard filter lawsuit center if you want to know more about IVC filter lawsuit.

The IVC filter’s purpose is to prevent blood clots from entering the heart, lungs, kidneys or brain by catching the clots in the bloodstream and allowing them to break down over time. The filters often are used with patients who are not able to take anticoagulant medication (drugs that help prevent blood clots).

It’s recommended that the filter be removed from the patient within six to twelve weeks of being inserted. The longer the filter remains in the patient the more difficult it is to remove, and the greater chance of injury. If you want to get more knowledge about IVC Filter Lawsuit then you can click here.

Injuries from IVC Filter Implants

Some of the most common injuries and complications resulting from IVC implants include:

1.Perforation of the heart

2.Perforation of the lungs

3.Hemorrhagic pericardial effusion (blood around the heart)

4.Cardiac tamponade (disruption of the heart caused by excess fluid)

5.Ventricular tachycardia (accelerated heart beat)

6.Puncturing of the vena cava

These complications may result in the need for additional surgeries, long-term harm, or even death. To know more about Bard IVC Filter Attorneys for IVC Filter Complications Lawsuits, you can browse the web.

Why Are IVC Filter Lawsuits Being Filed

The claims involving the IVC Filter state the manufacturers of the device failed to warn patients and physicians of the increased risks of the filter breaking, and metal fragments moving through the blood, potentially damaging an organ.

Attorneys argue that C.R. Bard (the manufacturer) hid the results of its own research which had found the filter dangerous, and even forged an employee’s signature on an FDA application in order to get approval.